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Section 13: Permanent Speed Restriction Signs

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In contrast to the Scottish Region practice, a directional arrow sign, where provided, is usually positioned above the speed board [13.65 & 13.66]. Exceptionally, a directional arrow may point upwards [13.67], indicating that the sign applies to the straight route.

[13.65] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign with Directional Arrow (e.g. applicable to right-hand divergence). Click Here for Photo
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.66] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign with Directional Arrows applicable to divergences in both directions.
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.67] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign with Directional Arrows applicable to straight route as well as diverging route.
Area: Various   Usage: Low   Status: Uncertain

Local variations exist in the signing of non-standard differential PSRs, where the two speeds are combined on a single sign [13.68 - 13.71] or advance warning indicator [13.72 - 13.74].

[13.68] Non-standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign (combined).
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[13.69] Non-standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign (combined).
Area: Various   Usage: Low   Status: Uncertain
[13.70] Non-standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign (combined).
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[13.71] Non-standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign (combined).
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[13.72] Advance Warning Indicator applicable to a non-standard differential permanent speed restriction (combined).
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[13.73] Advance Warning Indicator applicable to a non-standard differential permanent speed restriction (combined).
Area: Various   Usage: Low   Status: Uncertain
[13.74] Advance Warning Indicator applicable to a non-standard differential permanent speed restriction (combined).
Area: Various   Usage: Low   Status: Uncertain

One variant type of combined non-standard differential speed restriction sign has the code letters indicating the type of train presented as a suffix after the relevant speed [13.75].

[13.75] Non-standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign (combined).
Area: Various   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain

On parts of the Eastern Region (Great Eastern Main Line and branches), a single-letter suffix after the lower figure (higher speed) indicates the type of train to which the restriction applies [13.76 & 13.77]. The suffixes used on these signs are:

[13.76] Non-standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Great Eastern Main Line   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain
[13.77] Non-standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign. Click Here for Photo
Area: Great Eastern Main Line   Usage: Medium   Status: Uncertain

It was the opening of the Channel Tunnel in 1994, linking the hitherto isolated railways of Great Britain with those in France, that first necessitated the presentation of permissible speed information in both miles per hour (MPH) and kilometres per hour (KMH). Signs showing both were provided in the vicinity of the Channel Tunnel terminal at Dollands Moor and Cheriton for the benefit of continental drivers working into the UK [13.78 - 13.80].

[13.78] Permissible Speed Sign showing both MPH and KMH.
Area: Dollands Moor / Cheriton   Usage: Low   Status: Historical
[13.79] Permissible Speed Sign showing both MPH and KMH.
Area: Dollands Moor / Cheriton   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent
[13.80] Advance Warning Indicator showing both MPH and KMH.
Area: Dollands Moor / Cheriton   Usage: Low   Status: Historical