Home Page > Section 13; pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Section 13: Permanent Speed Restriction Signs

(Page 3 of 6)


A range of experimental reflectorised permanent speed restriction indicator signs [13.43 - 13.46] was put on trial at a site near Bishopbriggs on the Scottish Region in November 1984. One sign was simply a reflectorised version of the existing 'cut-out' design of indicator (see [13.17]). Another was a larger version of the equivalent road sign and similar to the speed signs that were then in use throughout the Tyne & Wear Metro system [13.45].

[13.43] Experimental Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Bishopbriggs   Usage: Low   Status: Historical
[13.44] Experimental Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Bishopbriggs   Usage: Low   Status: Historical
[13.45] Experimental Permanent Speed Restriction Sign (subsequently adopted as standard).
Area: Bishopbriggs (subsequently All Areas)   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.46] Experimental Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Bishopbriggs   Usage: Low   Status: Historical

In May 1985, a special speed restriction sign was installed on the Up Main line at Acton Main Line (Western Region) to indicate a higher permissible speed applicable to HSTs. This sign, which was of a five-sided shape with the letters "HST" and the speed figure in black on a yellow background [13.47], was co-located with an ordinary speed sign. The higher speed applied as far as the next ordinary speed sign.

[13.47] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign applicable to HSTs.
Area: Acton Main Line   Usage: Low   Status: Historical

In June 1985, two experimental permanent speed restriction indicator signs were placed on a bridge abutment between Ruscombe and Maidenhead (Western Region) for evaluation purposes.

In 1985, the Scottish Region chose the circular permanent speed restriction sign with a red border (see [13.45]) as its new regional standard and made a start on installing these on a number of routes in place of the previous 'cut-out' signs. Where a restriction applied to a diverging route, an arrow was fitted below the speed sign [13.48 & 13.49] in a manner similar to the earlier 'cut-out' signs. A standard differential speed restriction was indicated by two signs placed one above the other on the same post [13.50].

[13.48] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign with Directional Arrow (e.g. applicable to left-hand divergence). Click Here for Photo
Area: Scottish Region   Usage: High   Status: Obsolescent
[13.49] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign with Directional Arrows applicable to divergences in both directions.
Area: Scottish Region   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent
[13.50] Standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Scottish Region   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent

In January 1986, an experimental reflectorised type of 'preliminary speed board' was put on trial at two sites on the Edinburgh - Glasgow line. The board was shaped like an inverted triangle and had a yellow background [13.51]. This was intended as a replacement for the earlier floodlit advance warning indicators (see [13.24]).

[13.51] Experimental Preliminary Speed Board.
Area: Edinburgh - Glasgow   Usage: Low   Status: Historical

In March 1986, the permanent speed restriction signs between Tonbridge and Bopeep Junction (near Hastings) were replaced with reflectorised signs. The new signs had black figures on a circular white background, surrounded by a black border [13.52].

[13.52] Permanent Speed Restriction Sign.
Area: Tonbridge - Bopeep Junction   Usage: Medium   Status: Historical

The new design of reflectorised advance warning indicator introduced as standard later in 1986 was similar in shape to the trial version (see [13.51]) but had a white background and a yellow border [13.53]. The shape of the sign is modified to a five-sided variant where there is limited clearance or where extra width or height is needed to accommodate the speed figure [13.54].

[13.53] Advance Warning Indicator. Click Here for Photo
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.54] Advance Warning Indicator (alternative shape).
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current

An advance warning indicator for a standard differential speed restriction is usually a five-sided shape [13.55], although a triangular variant was used on the Western Region [13.56]. An advance warning indicator for a non-standard differential speed restriction is also a five-sided shape [13.57].

[13.55] Advance Warning Indicator applicable to a standard differential permanent speed restriction.
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.56] Advance Warning Indicator applicable to a standard differential permanent speed restriction.
Area: Western Region   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent
[13.57] Advance Warning Indicator applicable to a non-standard differential permanent speed restriction. Click Here for Photo
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current

An advance warning indicator applicable to a speed restriction on a diverging route is fitted with a directional arrow pointing in the appropriate direction. The arrow sign is usually placed above the warning indicator [13.58], except on the Scottish Region, where it was originally placed below [13.59], consistent with the placing of the directional arrow below the Scottish Region's circular PSR signs (see [13.48]). Two arrows are displayed if the advance warning indicator applies to restrictions of equal speed on diverging routes to the left and the right [13.60 & 13.61].

[13.58] Advance Warning Indicator with Directional Arrow (e.g. applicable to left-hand diverging route).
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.59] Advance Warning Indicator with Directional Arrow (e.g. applicable to right-hand diverging route).
Area: Predominantly Scottish Region   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent
[13.60] Advance Warning Indicator with Directional Arrows applicable to diverging routes in both directions.
Area: All Areas   Usage: Medium   Status: Current
[13.61] Advance Warning Indicator with Directional Arrows applicable to diverging routes in both directions.
Area: Predominantly Scottish Region   Usage: Medium   Status: Obsolescent

The Scottish Region style of reflectorised PSR indicator (see [13.45]) was adopted as the standard throughout BR c.1987. Concurrently, a new design of standard differential speed restriction sign was introduced in which both speeds are exhibited on a single board and separated by a horizontal bar [13.62]. In areas of limited clearance, an elliptical sign may be used [13.63].

[13.62] Standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign. Click Here for Photo
Area: All Areas   Usage: High   Status: Current
[13.63] Standard Differential Permanent Speed Restriction Sign for use in areas of limited clearance.
Area: All Areas   Usage: Medium   Status: Current